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Marcia Weidler
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    Di Lorenzo

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Graciela Keane
Linda Larochelle
Gwen Harrison
    Lockhart

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The following artists currently have works on display at THE LOFT GALLERY. These images are representative examples of their works. Availability of these works is as current as humanly possible...they do go fast!!

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART, a Loft Gallery sculptor, was intrigued by art from an early age. Gwen’s serious pursuit came only after a career in journalism and twenty five years on Capitol Hill.  After two major life changes, she realized her eagerness to pursue her interest in art and started sculpture classes.  “I have always gotten excited when viewing sculpture . . . the shadows . . . the highlights . . . the facets . . . the use of negative space.  And I hope I succeed at spending a great deal more time in my studio at The Loft Art Center which is adjacent to the Gallery.”

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“J’adore le Ballet”, bronze with marble base, 20 x 11.5 x 6.5”

“Le Musique de Violon”, Bronze (lost wax) with wood base [12x6x5]
“I Love Wednesdays”, Crushed Marble/Resin [12x12x5]
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GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

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“Enraptured with Life”, Terra Cotta with stand [13x10x2.5]
“The Winner” [10”x10”x5”] – Crushed Marble/Resin (with patina) on Marble Base. 
“Ursa Minor”, terra cotta with wood base [9.5x26x8”]

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

“Anna” [31”x11”x9”] – Bronze (lost wax) on Marble Base. 

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
Sculpture - “The Gesture”

23x12x10 - Bronze mounted on a granite base.

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

"Bliss" [30"x8"x13"] -- Bronze (lost wax) on wooden base.

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
Maypole Muses [22x13x12] (Crushed Marble/Resin with patina on wood base).
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
"Ring Dancers" [15x8x8] -- Crushed Marble/Resin (with patinas) on Granite Bases (sold individually). As seen in "Duets Too" show.
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
"She Came Walkin' Down the Street" [20x18x7.5] -- Crushed Marble/Resin (with patina). “Bronze (lost wax) is also available.
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
"Madeleine" with new "Miss Twigga" (Swahili for giraffe) -- "Madeleine" in Bronze (lost wax); "Miss Twigga" in Crushed Marble/Resinn (with patina). Base not for sale. As seen in "Duets Too" show.
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
Strummin’ in Founders Park” [15x8x8] -- Crushed Marble/Resin (with patina).
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
Male Ballet Dancer (Crushed Marble/Resin with patina). [22X13X12]. “Bronze (lost wax) is also available.
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
"The Music Lingers" [14x13x12] -- Crushed Marble/Resin (with patina) on Walnut Base.
GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
"The Mask" [6x4x3.5] -- Crushed Marble/Resin (with patinas). Small masks on Wooden Bases.

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

Cat Nap Resin, 15x13x9 “Bronze (lost wax) is also available.

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

"Cougar I", 10 ½" tall,
Bronze

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART
The Newlyweds (Bronze, 19”)

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

Guardian, Terra Cotta on Wooden Base 12x8x9

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

Mommy Look, Bronze on Granite 12x8x12

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

I Do, Bronze mounted on marble 14x14x14

GWEN HARRISON LOCKHART

Circle of Love, Bronze on Granite 12x10x12

In addition to exhibiting her work at The Loft Gallery in Occoquan, Gwen has shown at various galleries in Alexandria and in special shows at Tysons corner, at 2100 M Street, NW, and at the Aiken Art Center in Aiken, South Carolina.  She has served on the Board of Directors of The Art League at the Torpedo Factory in various capacities since 1999, and had the honor of serving as President and Chairman of the  Board in FY06.  Also noteworthy, in October 2006, she received the 2006 Alex Award from the Alexandria Commission for the Arts for Excellence in Service to the Arts.  Following her September Artist of the Month Show, she will be looking forward to her first out-of-state show in November and December of this year at the Aiken Art Center in Aiken, South Carolina.

 

As a sculptor, her greatest pleasure is to constantly rotate the piece in order to appreciate all its angles, and the varying effects of light and the formation of shadows as she is working.  For years, her career was unrelated to art.  Those years, while rewarding, now enhance the sense of ecstasy she achieves when pursuing art and when being creative.  Lockhart sculpts in clay, plastilene or wax and captures both expression and likeness whether doing animals, heads/busts, or full figurative pieces.   Many of her sculptures, including commission pieces, have been molded and cast in bronze.  All of her bronzes are cast using the lost wax process, which requires three to four additional months.

About “Bronzes” and Casting in Bronze

When an artist creates a sculpture  (whether in terra cotta, wax, plastiline, or another product) they have the option of making castings.  Castings can be in bronze, plaster or fiberglass products, or resin.  Although the “Lost Wax Process” for bronze casting is expensive (cost varies depending upon the size and complexity of the work) bronze castings are very desirable.

When an artist makes the decision to cast in bronze, they must immediately decide how many castings will be in the “edition”.  I was told that 20-30 castings is relatively customary, although you will find artists in the high production arena casting a 100 or more.  I briefly experimented with an edition of 30, but now limit my editions to eight, i.e., 1/8, 2/8, 3/8, etc.   

Lastly, there are no identical bronzes when the artist uses the “Lost Wax Process”.   As explained below, a new wax figure and a new investment mold is needed for each bronze poured.  Because this wax figure, as well as the final bronze figure, must be cleaned and perfected, variations are unavoidable. 

Summary of the Lost Wax Process

The lost wax process is the traditional method of bronze casting .  It has been around for at least 5000 years, and is a complicated and difficult process:

  • A sculpture is created out of clay, wax or plaster.
  • A flexible rubber mold with a rigid “mother mold” is made of the sculpture.
  • The sculpture is removed from this mold and it is cleaned out thoroughly.
  • The mold is tied together and wax is poured inside.
  • The mold is removed and the seams and any casting imperfections in the new wax product are cleaned up by the artist.
  • Wax sprues and vents are attached to the sculpture so that the bronze can eventually be poured into the piece and gases can escape.
  • The wax piece is “invested” by repeatedly dipping it in a mixture of plaster and grog forming the new “investment mold” around the wax.
  • The investment mold is placed in a burn‑out oven to melt the wax out and dry the mold.
  • Bronze, which is an alloy consisting mostly of copper with small amounts of zinc, tin and lead, is melted in a crucible to a temperature of approximately 2000 degrees and poured into the warmed investment mold.
  • After cooling, the investment mold is broken off and the sprues and vents, which are now bronze, are removed.
  • The piece is sandblasted to clean the surface of the bronze from scaling and acids and oils.
  • A patina is applied to the surface. This is a chemical process that is etched into the surface of the bronze.
  • The finished bronze is now lightly waxed to preserve its patina.

 

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